Ep 70: Your Relationship with Mom Guilt

This episode is an excerpt from my interview on Melissa Snow’s Powerful Women Rising podcast. Melissa and I dive deep into the challenges of motherhood and entrepreneurship. Join us as we explore the often unspoken weight of mom guilt and the search for balance in our chaotic lives.

We discuss practical strategies for overcoming internal beliefs that lead to guilt, the importance of self-care, and how embracing natural productivity cycles can transform both our family life and business ventures.

Let’s redefine balance, prioritize what matters, and learn to trust the universe a little more during our seasons of ‘wintering’.

What you’ll learn in this episode:  

  • What is mom guilt, and why we experience it
  • Practical ways to balance motherhood with entrepreneurship
  • How reframing “work-life balance” to a “web of balance” can shift your experience
  • Strategies for overcoming mom guilt and changing beliefs about motherhood
  • Embracing natural cycles of productivity and rest

Featured on the Show: 

Click HERE to watch this video to learn The 3 Things to Avoid When Reading Self-Help Books

Listen to the Full Episode:

Full Transcript:

Welcome to the Mom on Purpose Podcast. I’m Lara Johnson and I’m here to teach you how to get out of your funk, be in a better mood, play more with your kids, manage your home better, get your to-do list done, and live your life on purpose. With my proven method this is possible for you and I’ll show you how. You’re not alone anymore, we’re in this together.

Melissa:

Good morning, Lara. Welcome to the podcast.

Lara:

Thank you. It’s good to be here.

Melissa:

Yeah, so excited to chat with you today. You are one of my favorite people and I was just telling you before we started recording, I listen to your podcast Mom on Purpose, even though I’m only a mom to furry things. But I just love your work and the whole time I was listening to the episode I was listening to this morning, I was like, “She’s so smart. Man, she’s so smart.” So I’m super excited to have you here to share your wisdom today. So before we dive into mom guilt, tell everybody just a little bit about you and about your own relationship with mom guilt.

Lara:

So I am a mom, clearly. I’ve got four kids. I’ve been married for 15 years. I’m a certified life coach for moms that feel called to something more. I think for me, the biggest thing with mom guilt was giving everything to everyone at all times day and night and realizing that I was not just the bottom of the barrel, I felt like I was the dirt under the barrel. Not that I didn’t value myself, it was that there was no time for me. That really came into play when I started my business and I started realizing that I could make time for my business and I still wasn’t making time for myself. So I was looking at all of this where it was like I could justify my business in the mom guilt because it was for my family, but I couldn’t justify time for myself even though I knew that I’m important.

So for me, I think my biggest relationship with mom guilt was making peace with caring for myself is caring for my children. We can talk more about that, but I think for me, it plagued me for many years. We talk about mom guilt, you hear it on social media all the time. We talk about it like it’s inevitable, but it doesn’t have to be inevitable. So I feel like I’ve healed that relationship with mom guilt, and very rarely does it come up. If it comes up now, I usually know it’s because I haven’t been sleeping enough. My brain already is running a lot more negative. So yeah, we can talk about how I’ve healed that. But I think for me that was the biggest shift was not accepting it as an inevitability, but that it was optional and I don’t have to feel that day in and day out anymore.

Melissa:

Yeah, that’s really good. I think it’s interesting what you said about how you could justify when you were taking time away from your family to work on your business because that had a direct impact on your kids that you could visibly see. I think there’s so many layers to mom guilt because you and I were talking about this earlier. If you are still working a full-time job during the day outside of your home and you’re trying to grow your business on the side, then that’s another element of how do I split this limited evening time between the kids, myself, my job, my husband, all the things. There’s another element where it’s like for some reason I think you don’t feel as guilty when you’re going to work and coming home from work. It’s not like I feel so bad that I was at work for eight hours because it’s like, no, that’s the thing that people do and that’s not a choice. But when you’re self-employed it feels more like a choice or a luxury sometimes. Very few times.

But something I think especially when we start to worry about how we’re being perceived by other people too, how hard can it be? You’re your own boss, you make your own schedule. Come on. So I think it’s interesting, all the different layers of it and you and I were talking about earlier is it’s not just work life balance. You’re balancing a whole bunch of things and then your brain is going to have a whole bunch of thoughts about how you’re balancing all those things, how you should be balancing all those things. So let’s talk a little bit about why you think we have mom guilt.

Lara:

Yeah, I think in order to think about why we have mom guilt, we should kind of break down what mom guilt is because I heard it once defined as wanting to be in two places at once. So it’s like this convergence of desires and only being able to pick one. And while I’ve always liked that definition, I’ve started to chip away a little bit more as I’ve thought about it for my clients on I love definitions, I love words. So even what is the definition of guilt? So I looked it up and it’s committed a specific or implied crime or offense. So when we think about mom guilt, I think it’s important to recognize what is the perceived crime that we are committing? What is the crime that we are doing against our kids? When we look at it that way, then you start understanding, okay, why do we have this?

It’s some kind of internal belief that we have that we are committing a crime against our children. I like using that word crime because I think already I’m not committing a crime against my kids. I love my kids, I’m feeding them, I’m clothing them. But there is an internal belief that there is something happening that shouldn’t be happening against kids that you love. I think that’s why we have it is because we have some kind of internal belief system that we are coming up against. When we come up against that, we think we’re losing every time, thus the mom guilt. So for me, that’s kind of where I think about why we have it. It’s really understanding our internal belief systems that are very subconscious based on the culture, the religion, the society, the family, the generations that you’re part of.

That’s what you’re bringing into surface. So an example of this for me was when I was growing up and I have amazing parents. Let’s just say I love my parents, I have amazing grandparents. There were times because of the society and the culture that I was raised in that there would be very small comments about my mom working or other moms working where it was like, “Well, she doesn’t have to work. She could be home with her kids. She would just have to spend less.” So then it became really this weird internalized thing or I remember being told by an extended family member, “Grow up and find someone that makes money so you can stay home with your kids. That’s the ideal.” So then when I got to the point where I wanted to work and I wanted to have a business, I had to start confronting all of those small comments that had built up these bricks one after another in my brain. I had to break through that wall and that’s where I found relief on the other side from the mom guilt.

Melissa:

Yeah, absolutely. Because I think so much of it, maybe all of it is created by whatever stories we’re telling ourselves about what kind of a mom we should be. This is a very, very minor scale. I actually despise it when people refer to their pets as their children or their fur children. I’ve watched my sister raise four human babies, it is nothing even remotely close. But this isn’t the best comparison I have for it. I foster kittens and sometimes I’ll have these really tiny kittens that are just very needy and they’re all upstairs in a room and sometimes I’ll be down here and I’ll be working for six hours. I’m like, “Shit, I didn’t feed the kittens. I haven’t gone and visited the kittens. I haven’t done anything with the kittens all day.” They’ve just been up there by themselves and I feel so bad about it.

And really I only feel that way because there’s all these stories that are 100% not true because kittens don’t have the same thoughts and feelings that humans do. They’re not up there thinking they’ve been abandoned and that I don’t love them and that the world is a horrible place. But in my mind, that’s what I think. I think I see moms do that same thing of love. This means I’m not a good mom or I didn’t pay enough attention to my kids today, or it’s the worst thing in the world that my kids were at home and bored all day and I didn’t take them anywhere or whatever it is. I think that’s an important part of breaking down that mom guilt is like you said, looking at those stories and thinking about where did those stories and those beliefs come from?

Are those actually stories and beliefs that I believe, that I want to hang onto, that are serving me, that are serving my kids, as opposed to just letting that narrative run in your head and make you feel guilty forever. Because there is no end goal of mom guilt. There is no finish line where it’s like, “Okay, here’s the rubric. You did X, Y, and Z, you spent this much time with them. Their dinner was this healthy, they were this happy today. No mom guilt for you.” It doesn’t exist.

Lara:

So I was coaching a client on this once where she was feeling really bad about not spending enough time with her kids. So I pulled up the CDC requirement. If we are going to create a rubric on when you can let go of it, the CDC recommends you spend five minutes uninterrupted with your children.

Melissa:

A day?

Lara:

And I was like, I guarantee, I guarantee every mom spends five minutes.

Melissa:

Oh, you guys are nailing it.

Lara:

Seriously.

Melissa:

Just wrap this podcast up right now. You guys got it covered.

Lara:

Totally. I’m like, if we are going to look at statistics, the CDC, this is what they recommend, which is crazy to think about. So I think it’s so important to realize that we are all doing better than we are giving ourselves credit for. We are caring about our kids, we are feeding our kids, we are thinking about their emotional wellbeing. I’ve told my clients this before, I’m like, “If you are concerned about mom guilt and concerned about your children, you’re already doing better than you think you are.”

Because clearly some loving adult cares about them. Even if you look at the research because I know some people listening to this. They’re like, “Okay, but for sure kids need more than five minutes.” I’m like, “Yeah, for sure.” But we just use that as, again, the rubric. But even the research that I’ve looked at of war torn countries and how do you set up children that have been through refugee camps and had their parents torn away from them, how do they function? How are their needs being met? The only thing, it’s not the amount of school, it’s not the amount of healthy food. The thing that sets them most up for success is having a loving adult in their lives. Only one. I guarantee all of the moms listening to this are that loving adult for their children. I think that right there also, that is evidence-based. So when we start giving ourselves this evidence, we can then start challenging some of the beliefs that we have. That’s really the only way you can start breaking down your beliefs around mom guilt.

Melissa:

For sure. So is that the antidote to mom guilt, would you say? We understand where it comes from, we understand a lot of these beliefs, a lot of these thoughts that we have may or may not necessarily be true. What do we do from there?

Lara:

Yeah, I believe that.

Melissa:

Besides hire you.

Lara:

Well, I would highly recommend that or at least listen to the podcast because you’re going to want to. Yeah, I think that is the antidote is the only way that you can start breaking it down is to start challenging the internal beliefs that you have. Most of the time we’re not aware of what those are. So kind of a backdoor, going back to the definition of mom guilt that we can go through, when you start to feel that mom guilt, you have to first recognize when you’re feeling it and you have to name it. Because it will kind of be like this background noise of your brain and your body where you don’t actually realize it’s there or why you’re doing certain things. But when you actually stop, for me, mom, guilt starts in my gut and moves to my heart. It becomes a pit in my stomach that then breaks my heart because I feel like I’m failing my kids in some way.

So for me, that’s when I recognize, okay, that’s mom guilt. Then I just kind of pause and I think, all right, what crime do I think I’m committing against my kids? And again, I use that word crime because it seems so outrageous that it almost stops us. Instead of thinking what’s the internal belief I have? It’s like, no, no, my brain actually thinks I’m committing a crime. What is it? So it’s almost like a jolt, it’ll get you out of it. So then it might be, well, I should be spending more time with my kids. Okay, well let’s look at this in a different way. And that’s for me, what I started doing was finding a lot of examples of moms that I believed were exceptional moms that were spending less time with their kids than I was. And not in a comparison way of just being like, okay, that woman astronaut I believe is a really good mom and she is an astronaut and she is in space for this amount of time.

What about this mom that’s deployed and serving for our country? Do I believe that she could be a good mom? If I were talking to her and I was friends with her, what would I be telling her about her relationship with her kids? So I started using all of these examples and thinking, okay, well how could she be a good mom even if she was deployed? Okay, well I could do those things now, simple as that. So I started finding and chipping away. It wasn’t like, I’m just going to think this happy thought and mom guilt is going away. It was like, no, I am actually going to go deep into my brain and find examples to prove my brain wrong. I truly believe that a mom that is deployed can be an exceptional mom. How does she do that? Okay, I am going to do those things now. At least for me, that was the biggest thing. I’ve seen that really help my clients as the antidote for mom guilt.

Melissa:

For sure. I also like what you said before we started recording about realizing that it’s not always one or the other. There are things that you can do and that you will do when you’re working on your business or you’re building your business or you’re doing a sales call or whatever it is that are going to make you a better mom. There are things that you do when you are a mom that are going to make you a better human or a better business person or whatever. Talk about that a little bit.

Lara:

And that’ll be fun if we ever want to do another episode on that. But I think, I’m trying to remember if I have an episode of it on my podcast. Instead of work-life balance I call it the web of balance. I used to teach corporate workshops on this because work-life balance is such a challenging thing because mentally, anytime you say work-life balance, there’s two categories and you’re putting it almost on a scale. If you’re feeding one, then the other one is tipped. What I realized was that was such an unhealthy way to think about things because life has so many categories in it, but yet it seemed like work was the one always getting the attention. So all these other areas were suffering. But when I really started thinking about it, I imagined a spider web where there is this web and we have all these spindles that are coming off and all these spindles are different priorities that we have.

When we are focusing on one of those priorities, it’s connected to all the other spindles. So when you’re looking at something like one of my spindles is self-preservation, and I call it self-preservation, it’s self-care, but that sounds optional to my brain, so I call it self-preservation. When I am spending time, there is a direct impact on my family and my business and I have to preserve myself in order to keep that web strong. Same thing when I am working with my kids, for example. So I’ve got two out of the four of my kids are autistic. They have significant challenges, they’re very high needs, one of them is homeschooled. So when I think about the things I am learning there, the communication skills, the problem solving, the creativity, that directly impacts my business. I’m taking those same skills I’m learning with my kids and implementing them in my business, therefore making more money, which then blesses my family and then it starts moving through.

But what’s cool about that is that at any given time, one of those spindles can fall off and the web still stays intact. It’s a lot to take down an entire spider web. That to me helps my brain think, okay, even when I feel like I have nothing left to give, my web is still mostly intact and I’m going to care for the spindles that are there while rebuilding the others. So for me, it just allows for, it is almost like everything can kind of flow together in this beautiful unity that the universe has provided for us. I love nature, so I love being able to take those lessons and see how do I apply that into my own life and motherhood.

Melissa:

So what do you do when you feel like you have nothing left to give? Because I know that’s a big challenge for me in business. It always feels like there’s something else that needs my attention, someone else that needs something from me, some brilliant idea I just came up with at three o’clock in the morning that I think has to be executed right this second. I know that’s a struggle for moms too, feeling like everybody always needs something from them. Inevitably you get to the point that you’re like, I have nothing left for you, for my business, for nothing. I’m just going to go lie down. But I can’t.

Lara:

I think it’s such an important… Again, I love to study nature. I live near the mountains, I’m in the mountains regularly, and we’re at the season where the leaves are starting to change and pretty soon they’ll drop, we’ll enter winter and things look so different. I think so much of us demand that our bodies and our businesses stay in spring and summer at all times and where we’re always trying to grow and to bloom and we keep going. Even thinking about a tree that has all of its leaves on and it provides shade for other people and it’s providing, we’re in harvest and all this food is coming. I just think about how interesting that is that we demand that, but yet even nature doesn’t do that. So our bodies are not built to be on and full steam at all times. I recognize this even in myself.

I feel like I’m in a more wintering season right now where I’m at my max capacity. My youngest is 10 months old right now, so we’re coming out of the first year postpartum. We had to pull my oldest autistic son out of school this last year. My husband’s just about to change jobs. So there’s these big life things that are happening and I feel like I’ve needed to winter because I have nothing left to give. And again, it goes back to our thoughts on I shouldn’t be doing this, I should be doing this. I’ve really had to give myself permission that if nature is allowed to do this, so am I. When I get to that spot, I build a hierarchy of priorities within my mind where yeah, sometimes I do still have to show up for my kids. They don’t stop. I choose to still show up for my clients, but there are pieces within that I just stop doing in my wintering season.

So an example of that is I don’t think I’ve posted on social media in weeks because I’m in a wintering season and that’s one of those hierarchies that I choose not to. I just trust that the universe will pick up the algorithm and clearly I believe in God. Other people believe just a higher being. But I think it’s important to recognize that we can still trust in that higher being to make up the difference when we’re in a wintering season. So when I think about those hierarchies, it’s important to think, I know very quickly when my body starts to shift. I’ll start like, check that’s off, that’s off, that’s off, that’s off, that’s off, that’s off. Those are no longer important. I will not walk into my toy room at all during my wintering season. This last time, it had been like nine months since I had cleaned the toy room.

Very simple things where we might eat out more during the wintering season. My kids might have more electronic time during the wintering season. I may do laundry but leave it in the baskets. I’m showing up to client calls, but I might not be having my hair fully done. It might be in a ponytail with some frizzy curls in the back. But that’s my hierarchy of priorities and that’s what allows me to go into my wintering state while still showing up for the people that I love and I care about and the ways that I provide for my family.

Melissa:

I think what you said about faith or about trust or whatever it is that you want to call it, whatever resonates with you is really the key underneath all that. Because I’m certain there are people listening to this podcast that are like, “How in the world do you go nine months without cleaning your toy room? I can’t even go 24 hours without doing it.” And same with posting on social media. I see this all the time. I tell my clients this all the time with networking events. It’s like they get so in their head about If I don’t go to this one networking event that’s going to make all the difference in my business. They don’t actually believe that, but somewhere in their brain, their brain is like, “No, you have to go for your business.”

So to be able to have that faith or that trust or whatever it is that allows you to say the toy room can be messy for nine months, it’s not full of sharp objects, it’s not full of anything that’s going to hurt them. It’s just toys all over the floor and everything’s fine. I cannot post on social media for two weeks. I cannot post on social media for two months. Everything’s still going to be okay. That I think is a huge component of that. Don’t you agree?

Lara:

Completely. I think we get so caught up in the word consistency. Consistency, it’s like our brain hears that word, oh, I have to be consistent. I have to do this. We think that means daily. But I always come back to social media. How is that not being consistent? It may look very different than other people, and I’m okay with that. But again, I think it is important to look at nature and the seasons where they always come out of the season. It is consistent. Every year they come out of winter. Of course we will. I think that’s the other thing that I see with my clients a lot is they’re like, “Well, what if I don’t want to come back? Or what if I winter and how do I know when I’m done wintering?” There’s this pressure.

Melissa:

What if I winter forever?

Lara:

Yes, yes. What’s so funny, I had a genuine fear after I took a maternity leave. This was the first time I had taken away three months from my business. I totally stepped away from it. I genuinely thought, I don’t know if I’m going to want to go back. What happens if I don’t want to go back? What do I do with my clients? I’ll have to refund a bunch of people. It was so interesting because I kept going back on like, “No, I’m going to trust my body. I am going to trust my body to know when it’s time to turn back on.” Two to three weeks before my maternity leave ended, I could not wait. It was like Christmas morning. It was like all of a sudden my body had gone into this wintering and I could just feel it starting to bloom again.

I think for most of us, we’ve never given our bodies a chance to do that because we’ve been living in burnout for so long that we don’t have that trust built yet with our bodies. But if you truly, genuinely on a deep level experiment with that, you’ll see that it does turn back on. There are times where all of a sudden one morning I’ll wake up and be like, “Yes, I can’t wait to share this on social media.” You know my history with social media. Melissa and I have known each other for very, very many years as we’ve grown our business. I’ve never wanted to post on social media, but I realized it was because so much of that was I was in burnout. Now when I’m coming out of my wintering season, I get excited to talk to people online and I do that by posting. So it just is really fascinating to me to see how we can develop that trust not only in God and a higher being, the universe, but also within our body to know what it’s doing.

Melissa:

For sure. I want to ask you one more question that I didn’t prepare you for, so I know you can answer though because you’re so smart. I’m just thinking, I always try when I’m interviewing someone on my podcast, I always try to think, if I were listening to this podcast, what would I be screaming at the radio? Whatever it is that what we listen on these days. I’m 90, why am I screaming at my boombox, my Walkman? I think my question is how does this work for someone who is an entrepreneur or self-employed? Maybe they just started or they’ve been in business several years, but they’re still not making consistent income.

I feel like if I’m listening to this, I’m thinking, okay, but wintering sounds like a luxury. Wintering sounds like something you can do when you’re like, I have a bunch of clients, I’m making a bunch of money. I can take a step back because I have these have an audience, I have funnels, I have automations, I have all this thing in place, and so it will keep going and I can trust that it will keep going. But what do we do when we’re not at that space yet, when we still have that, “Okay, yeah, but I need to make money.” How do we balance that?

Lara:

I think that’s such a great question. I’ll tell you personally, my body would winter whether I liked it or not. Ultimately things would happen in my life, I would get sick, I wouldn’t have money, I wouldn’t have clients. It was almost like the universe kept bringing those seasons to me and then I just fought and fought and fought when I was in them because I didn’t have that trust. I think the difference now is I can feel when my body is going there and I go with it instead of fighting against it. So I love what you said on that is a mindset shift that wintering is a luxury. I used to believe that 1,000% and now I realize that wintering is happening whether I like it or not. Now I am at a spot where I have tools in place to hunker down and ride the storm.

That’s what allows me to make more consistent income because the second that storm is over, I pick right up and I run full steam and I make so much more money when I do. But what I realized was so much of the inconsistent income was coming when I was fighting during the wintering, and then I was even more exhausted and never actually coming out of it. So even looking at a woman’s menstrual cycle, for example. When you’re looking at, there are certain times where you just have more energy and then there is a week where you can fight and you can push, but you’re going to be wasted no matter what. You might as well start planning that into your schedule, even if it’s just mentally being nicer to yourself during that time. Going back to again, the luxury comment, I shared physical things that drop off, but there are mental things that drop off as well.

I do not keep myself to a higher standard when I’m in a wintering season. There are expectations that I let go of. Self expectations that I let go of so that I’m able to better care for my body. So even if you’re not at a spot where you can’t not post on social media or you do have to make money so that you can eat, what are the things that you can drop off? Again, that’s where that hierarchy comes in. So sometimes it may just be that you’re not allowed to be mean to yourself during that phase. It’s just plain and simple, nope, I’m in training right now. I don’t get to judge myself for having my leaves off. Oh, I’m living in my robe a little bit more than I would normally do. That’s okay.

Melissa:

Yeah. And you have to be honest with yourself when it comes to what things can I drop off, whether it’s mental or actual actions. Because I see that a lot with clients of the belief that these are things that I can’t drop off, that if I’m not posting on social media every day or three times a day or whatever it is, that is going to have a direct result on my income. But then if we look back on the last six months and what brought you income, none of it was related to your posts on social media. Maybe three quarters of it came from client referrals or from people you met in networking events or podcast interviews that you did or whatever it is. So really look at the data in order to be honest with yourself about what those income producing activities are and what are the activities that you’re doing that you are hoping will produce income at some point. Maybe those are the ones that can drop off when you’re wintering.

Lara:

I think it’s important to look at those in general to know your numbers for yourself. When you’re looking at those numbers and getting down to the data, then you can start making really strategic plans. So one of the examples, when I was in a wintering state, this was a couple of years ago, going to networking events, it was out of my realm of possibility. My husband was working insane hours, I couldn’t find a sitter, my kids were really hard. I had no emotional energy to go and meet people, but I realized that I like and still do read a lot of books. So I just started getting creative. What can I do with that? I like to teach and I like books. So I came up with this idea of a virtual book club. I was like, well, I’m reading these books anyway.

I might as well just talk about them with other people that brings them into my space so I’m not expending the energy I don’t have to go into someone else’s space. I’ve had such huge success building clientele from that and that wasn’t the intention. It was just to get to know people. But it’s cool to see financially how that one idea that came during wintering and just opening the doors for other people to listen to what I was already doing, brought in significant income. So I think in those wintering times, you can get really creative too on what can you do and how can you just open it up to be with others maybe in the process. It doesn’t mean that you completely stop all things business. I still do business. It just looks a little different. I get a little more creative during those times.

Melissa:

That’s so good. I love that. I feel like we could keep going on this topic for a long time.

Lara:

That’s the problem with us is we could just talk for days.

Melissa:

Well, there’s so many layers to it.

Lara:

I think it all comes back to the topic of mom guilt. That to me, especially when I’m in that phase of wintering, that self-preservation, that is one of the top priorities I have, is I am not allowed to judge myself. Clearly God knew my body and the kids that I have, and he knows and understands. I am Christian so those that are Christian that are listening to this, there’s a reason why Jesus disappeared for 40 days. He was wintering. We have examples in the scriptures of wintering. We just don’t give ourselves the same permission and then we guilt ourselves because we think we’re committing a crime against our kids. When in reality this is the natural seasons of life and we can accept that. I do believe that is the healthy antidote to mom guilt. Totally.

Melissa:

Absolutely. That’s so good. So if anybody wants to connect with you further, if they want to listen to your awesome podcast, if they want to be a part of your book club where you don’t actually have to read the book, by the way, Lara reads it for you. Every busy mom. My sister, I sent her a picture of all these books I have, her and my mom. I was like, “Does anybody want these books?” My sister’s like, “I do. I like to pretend like I have time to read books.” I’m like, “Go to Lara’s book club. She’ll read it for you.”

Lara:

Totally, yeah. So you can find me on Mom on Purpose Podcast with Lara Johnson. You can go to my website, which is Lara Johnson coaching.com, and Lara is spelled just L-A-R-A Johnson coaching.com. There’s a link there that you can click and it says book club. Once you click on that, you can enter your email so that you can join the calendar, which will list all of the books that we do. You’ll also get a guide sent to you of all the books we’re reading for this year. There’s also a video on the three things to avoid when reading self-help books.

It’s an exceptional video because I find that a lot of entrepreneurs love to read self-help, but really struggle taking in all the information and knowing how to apply it. So that video is really useful for you so that you know exactly what to avoid. Then of course, Melissa mentioned the book club. You don’t have to read the book to join. I read you the book and then teach it to you and how to apply it. So there’s that. Then the last thing would be Instagram. You can find me there at J.Lara, L-A-R-A.Johnson, and then we can connect that way. Thank you for listening. Please share, review, and subscribe to this podcast so that together we can live life on purpose.

How to Connect with Lara:

Web: www.larajohnsoncoaching.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/j.lara.johnson/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/larajohnsoncoaching

Work with Lara: www.larajohnsoncoaching.com/work-with-me/

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3 Things to Avoid When Reading Self Help Books

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